Tuesday, December 12, 2017

StoryMaps Online Course

Regular readers of the blog will know that I've been sharing a range of StoryMaps over the last couple of years, as the ESRI map-making technology has developed apace. They are a wonderful way of shaping a narrative from images, mapping and interactive elements.

If you want to take your use of StoryMaps to the next level, and have some of your CPD budget left to spend, you might want to check out a new course that is being offered by Joseph Kerski, who travels the world talking about the power of GIS. The course is being made available through eNet Learning, and costs $95 (or whatever that is in pounds these days)
Details of the course are here - it starts on the 4th of January 2018

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course will enable participants to understand why stories can be effectively told with today’s interactive, web-based story maps, learn how to teach and assess student work with story maps, and learn how to create story maps that incorporate sounds, video, photographs, narrative, and other multimedia. Through readings, videos, quizzes, discussion with your colleagues, and hands-on activities, you will learn how and why to create story maps using the ArcGIS Online platform and be confident that you can use these tools in your instruction.

COURSE BACKGROUND:

For thousands of years, maps have been used to tell stories. These maps told which lands were “known” and which lands were “terra incognita”, coastlines and new political boundaries, and routes of famous explorers. As in the past, maps are used today to tell stories about the regions, places, and physical and cultural characteristics of our world.

Today’s maps are detailed, allowing exploration of the median age and income of a community’s neighborhoods and the chemical conditions of water in specific wells or soil in a specific field. Maps give information about data that is occurring in real time—such as current wildfire extents, weather, earthquakes, or the location of all of a city’s buses. Maps describe historical events from famous battles to land use changes over time in a rainforest. Maps can be in two dimensions, and three dimensions, and can be accessed on any device—smartphone, tablet, or laptop computer. They can be embedded in web pages and other multimedia and other tools, and can be updated instantly by citizen scientists using their smartphones. Maps cover thousands of relevant themes and phenomena and scales–from local to global scale.

Another key difference between modern maps versus those of the past is that modern maps are much more than reference documents. True, maps still show us where things are. But they are valued because they help us understand the “whys” of “where” – by allowing us to use spatial analytical tools to detect patterns, relationships, and trends. Thus, maps have become critical analytical tools that can help us solve the problems in our world that are growing more complex and increasingly affect our everyday lives. These include epidemics, biodiversity loss, natural hazards, agricultural viability, political instability, climate change, food security, energy, water quality and quantity, and many more.

Globally, you could make maps of any of the above themes. In your own community, you could tell stories about sports, community gardens, housing type, schools and libraries and other community resources, tree cover, litter and graffiti, zoning changes, historical settlement, how your community compares to others across your region or to those halfway around the world, and other aspects of your community through these live story maps. Students can use story maps to report on the results of their investigations. As a researcher, you or your students could use these maps to investigate pertinent issues in human health, sociology, political geography, public safety, or a host of other disciplines. As an instructor, you could use maps to tell stories to enhance your lessons in courses ranging from geography to biology to history to language arts to earth science to mathematics, and other disciplines. You can use story maps to assess student work and a method whereby students can communicate their investigations to you and to their peers.

Tuesday, December 05, 2017

Protecting communities against Tsunamis

Another excellent StoryMap. Thanks to Bob Lang for the tipoff to this one...

Saturday, December 02, 2017

#125geotips

As a member of the Geographical Association's Secondary Phase Committee for the last 13 years (with a short break while I worked for the GA), I've presented many times at the GA Conference since, and also been involved in national curriculum change discussions, awarding body consultations for new GCSEs, consultative groups, book reviewing and many other contributions to the work of the GA.
Follow us on Twitter too please @GA_SPC

This year we are tweeting out 125 Top Tips.
We've produced a series of Top Tips before, and you can access or download them all from our SPC page on the GA website.

Here's the Advent Calendar that I put together to get the project off to a good start too...
Keep following for the next 125 days, which are also a countdown (or count up) to the GA Conference in Sheffield.
2018 marks the 125th anniversary of the GA, hence the 125 tips

Follow us on #125geotips and please feel free to send us any suggestions of your own to get involved in the project please. We'll happily RT your own geographical toptips with the hashtag...

Thursday, November 09, 2017

Land Use Cover mapping

Alasdair Rae has produced a number of excellent maps, and this is one his most useful projects to date.
This BBC News article is interesting, and explains something of the project.

 
You can use the tool linked to from above to explore your own area.
Have a guess what the percentages might be before you do this, or compare your area with the country.
There are some interesting additional facts in this blog. I like this one for example:

Buildings cover less of Britain than the land revealed when the tide goes out...

Download the whole Atlas of Land Cover in the UK here....

I put in my own postcode where I live, expecting a larger than average amount for farmland...
And unsurprisingly, it is up to 81%, with only 3% built on...
 

You can follow Alasdair on Twitter. @undertheraedar

Sunday, November 05, 2017

Parallel Maps

There are many map visualisations out there, and most of them have appeared on LivingGeography over the years.
Parallel maps have been getting a lot of attention over the last few days as one of their latest projects (from October 2017), which maps census data on population structure has been more widely discovered.
It includes a 3D option with panning and tilting of the mapping.
 
The population pyramids are drawn instantly as the cursor is moved over a particular Census output area.
This allows for instant comparisons between different parts of a city, or urban/rural comparisons, or a look at how certain areas are attracting retirement populations.

Here's evidence of Student populations being concentrated in certain areas of Leeds - linked to the OCR 'B' Geography chapters that I wrote.

It's worth remembering that there are other Parallel map projects too - explore the whole website to find maps on air quality and other variables.

For example, how about these COLOUR IN YOUR OWN MAPS options.

Zoom to an area, and then use the buttons to identify a particular colour for it...

These maps can also be switched to other views.

Also try the RISK OF FLOODING maps, from April 2017, which are particularly useful when exploring flood risk topics with students.


There are plenty more.... Lovely work by the folks at Parallel...

Thursday, November 02, 2017

StoryMaps

There have been many StoryMaps created over the last year or so, since the new templates made the process much easier.

One Twitter feed to follow is that of Allen Carroll.

He is the Programme Manager for Storytelling at ESRI, and former Chief Cartographer at National Geographic, so has quite a pedigree in map creation....
He regularly shares links to great StoryMaps, so follow him for plenty more...

Tourism StoryMap

Saturday, September 02, 2017

75 000 views

Up over 75 000 views... Thanks for visiting and reading...

SAGT Conference 2017



The booking form and programme for the 2017 SAGT Conference has now gone live.
I've been a regular attendee at this conference since 2005, but have missed the last few as I have been elsewhere... This year, I will be in Madrid, so unable to attend. I'm hoping to be back next year.



As you can see, there's a keynote by Tom Heap, and various workshops, all for a good price, and with free minibus pick-up from Stirling train station, which is a great help. There will also be 'hot spots' where teachers share practice.
A great day of learning and inspiration for all.

Book tickets now via Eventbrite.

Follow SAGT on Twitter @SAGTeach

Earlier that month there is also the ESRI Scottish user conference in Perth.
Addy Pope will be leading a seminar on ArcGIS Online at SAGT conference.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Monday, June 26, 2017

Google Earth Education

Launched in the last day or so: a new set of tools and resources and a rebrand for Google Earth continues, with this new Google Earth Education section.
See the resources and tools here.

More to come when I get the chance to explore in more detail...

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Shailey Minocha's Professorial Lecture

I've been involved with Shailey Minocha's work for just over a year. She was kind enough to visit our school twice to demonstrate Google Expeditions, and we also helped with a research paper she was writing with colleagues.


She gave her professorial lecture on Tuesday of this week. I was invited, but was unable to attend. Here's a trailer for it...



Shailey Minocha is a Professor in the Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics at The Open University. Her research has two strands: learning technologies and social computing.
Professor Minocha will show how virtual worlds bridge time and places, interleaving the virtual with the real – allowing people to communicate and collaborate with those whom they may have never met, experience places they may never be able to visit, shop, learn, and do research.
Professor Minocha will look at how virtual worlds provide ‘real’ experiences in ‘created’ environments – ‘as if I have met them’, or ‘as if I have visited that place’. Online technologies also provide real experiences beyond the physical world.  She will show how in a virtual world, people can “become” an avatar of their liking, fly, become microscopic, travel to the moon or visit the International Space Station, or look at the rock structures underneath the ground on which they are standing.


Good to see King's Ely getting a mention in Shailey's thanks.




You can watch the lecture here.